by Hope Johnson
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Posts tagged wedding stationery
BUILDING YOUR WEDDING SUITE SERIES | part four

PART FOUR: Mailing & Postage Requirements

One of the most overlooked expenses, not just within the wedding stationery, but the overall wedding planning budget, is postage! You will be mailing save the dates, wedding invitations (don’t forget the postage for the response card), and likely lots and lots of thank you notes. Stocking up and planning for postage is definitely something you’ll be doing very soon.

DID YOU KNOW POSTAGE RATES INCREASED IN 2017?

How Much Postage Will I Need?
Postage rates will vary and depend on a few factors: weight, size, and thickness.
-0-1 ounce | $0.49
-1-2 ounce | $0.70
-2-3 ounce | $0.91
-3-3.5 ounce | $1.21

Other than size, weight, and thickness, other factors may cause a surcharge or $0.21, like rigid or unevenness, perhaps a ribbon tied around the suite, a wax seal located on the outer envelope. The best thing to do before investing in all of the pretty stamps is to take a completed suite to your post office and get a professional postage quote.

STANDARD MAILING STAMPS:
You can purchase standard rate, face value postage from your local post office or on USPS.com. Face-value postage means that the postage you pay is the postage represented for that stamp. So if you need a $0.70 stamp, you are paying $0.70 for that stamp, face value, unlike custom and vintage stamps which are not face value.

CUSTOM STAMPS:
You’ve probably seen or received a wedding invitation that had a custom postage stamp with a cute wedding monogram with the bride and groom’s initials. These custom stamps do not come at face value. They are typically about 1.5-2 times the cost of a face value stamp. For instance, if you need a $0.70 stamp, you’re probably going to actually pay about $1.30 per stamp. This comes at a sticker shock for many brides, but when you do the math, it’s about another $60-70 for every hundred invitations. It’s a slight increase in your investment, but can really change the look of your presentation.

VINTAGE STAMPS:
The old phrase “they don’t make ‘em like they used to” holds true here. They just don’t make stamps like they used to and the recent frenzy with vintage stamps is one I am definitely on board for. Vintage stamps are collected and purchased through small businesses and shops and available in an array of really intricate and colorful designs. The same value holds true with a custom stamp, you are paying 1.5-2 times the actual value. Again, this can often detour couples away, but vintage stamps, a row of two or three or six can really create a beautiful added touch to your stationery. Although it’s in increase in your investment, it’s often one that’s worth the push.

Like I stated above, the best thing you can do when mailing off your wedding stationery is to have a completed sample quoted by a professional mail service vendor. If you have some extra time, have your stationer print a couple of extras with your own address to test how they deliver before mailing your entire batch.

BIG IMPORTANT TIP:
Make friends with the postman (or woman) and ask them to hand cancel your wedding stationery. Have you ever gotten mail with that black barcode line at the bottom of the invitation? No one wants that on their wedding invitation. I believe every calligrapher and stationer would die a little inside. Asking your post office to hand-cancel your envelopes will prevent your wedding invitations from becoming machine sorted (yay for no black lines). Hand-cancelling is literally taking that cute little round circle stamp and “canceling” or marking paid your postage stamps by hand. This is a much safer route as well, as many wedding envelopes are more delicate.

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TLBC TIP:
A great way to get the vintage stamp look without spending too much on postage is to combine a face value forever stamp to cover the bulk of your postage, then have your remaining postage reflect in vintage stamps. Let's say your total postage cost is $0.70, use a $0.49 forever stamp and make up the $0.21 extra in two or three vintage stamps. This will give you that same vintage look and save you a few dollars. 

My favorite USPS Forever Stamp is the "Classics Forever," portraying images of different presidents that were once illustrated or engraved by different artists. Plus, they have that vintage look! These are great for response envelopes as well. 

BONUS VENDOR TIP:  
They certainly don't make stamps like the used to, so I gather different vintage stamps from an array of stamp collectors. If you want to grab some of your own vintage stamps, reach out to Virginia with Verde Studios on Etsy. She can curate a specific collection for you based on a design you're looking to create, a color scheme, etc. or you can buy small batches right off of her shop. 

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Helpful guidance from the US Post Office found here

BUILDING YOUR WEDDING SUITE SERIES | part three

PART THREE: Envelope Addressing & Etiquette

Probably equally importantly as the stationery itself, you have your envelope addressing. Without this step, those pretty envelopes will go nowhere. Plan ahead if you wish for your envelopes addressed by hand by a calligrapher. Calligraphers often need several weeks, at least, to complete certain types of calligraphy, but more time is always better.

ADDRESSING ETIQUETTE:


CLOSE FAMILY & FRIENDS. Outer envelopes are always addressed with full names. Inner envelopes are addressed with familiar names and titles for close family members and good friends.

OUTER ENVELOPE
Mr. and Mrs. Michael Scott Landry Miss Carrie Faye Landry
INNER ENVELOPE
Uncle Michael and Aunt Norah Cousin Carrie

MARRIED COUPLES WITH YOUNG CHILDREN. If you know the children personally, you can address the inner envelope with first names only. Otherwise, you would use the children’s full names without titles. You generally would not include the children’s name on the outer envelope.

OUTER ENVELOPE
Mr. and Mrs. Tyler Lee Cliburn
INNER ENVELOPE
Mr. and Mrs. Cliburn Benjamin and Lisa

* If there are several siblings in the home, you can address the inner envelope to “The Misses Cliburn” (for two more more sisters) or ”The Messrs. Cliburn (for two or more brothers); or both

TEENAGERS IN THE HOME. Children aged 13+ should really receive individual invitations. If this isn’t possible, include them in their parents’ invitation with courtesy titles. Teenage girls are “Miss,” but the title “Mr.” is reserved for young men 18 years old and older.

COUPLES WHO LIVE TOGETHER. As long as you know that two people at the same address live together as a couple, you can address one invitation to both.

OUTER ENVELOPE
Mr. Colin Lane McGee Miss Cara Emily Holmes
INNER ENVELOPE
Mr. Colin and Mrs. Cara

AN INVITEE & GUEST. If you are using an inner envelope, do not include “and guest” on the outer envelope. If you use a single envelope, address as followed:

OUTER ENVELOPE (no inner envelope)
Mr. Matthew Dean Henson and guesT

OUTER ENVELOPE
Mr. Matthew Dean Henson
INNER ENVELOPE
Mr. Henson and Guest

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PROFESSIONAL TITLES. Professional titles are written out in full on both the wedding wording and on the envelope addressing. “Doctor and Mrs. Tyler Grant Howard.” If both the husband and the wife both carry professional titles, you would address the envelope as followed: “The Doctors Kleinpeter” -or- “Doctors Timothy and Emily Kleinpeter.”

MILITARY TITLES. When the bride and/or groom or the parents of the bride or groom are members of the military services or serving active duty, their military titles are used. All military titles are spelled out and not abbreviated on the invitation, mailing addresses, or any other stationery. 

ABBREVIATIONS. You should not abbreviate "Doctor" as you would on other phrases (Mr., Mrs., Ms.). You can abbreviate Sr. and Jr. if wished. You should spell out any other words, like the state, road, street, etc.


FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

WHAT IF I DON'T WANT TO INVITE CHILDREN?
If you wish to have an adults only ceremony and reception, you simply would not include the children's names on the inner envelope. 

WHAT IF I DO WANT TO INVITE CHILDREN?
If you wish to invite children to your ceremony and reception, you would include the children's name on the inner envelopes following the etiquette above. Teenage children living in the home should receive their own invitation. 

DO I INCLUDE THE LAST NAMES FOR CHILDREN?
For young children, you do not need to include the last name on the inner envelope.

HOW INFORMAL SHOULD THE INNER ENVELOPE BE?
The inner envelope should dictate the more casual version of the outer envelope; however, there are several acceptable options:

Let's say your outer envelope reads "Mr. and Mrs. Michael Dean Johnson," here are some inner envelope variations:
"Mr. and Mrs. Johnson" (formal)
"Mr. Michael and Mrs. Hope" (formal)
"Michael and Hope" (semi-formal)
"Uncle Mike and Aunt Hope (personable) 

Have a specific question? ASK AWAY:

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Stay tuned for part three in this four part “Building Your Wedding Suite Series”
part three | postage & assembly

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CATCH THE FIRST TWO POSTS FROM THIS SERIES:

BUILDING YOUR WEDDING SUITE SERIES: part two

PART TWO: Wedding Invitation Pieces & Parts

The Basics
The invitation is a key piece of the puzzle during your wedding planning. It essentially invites your nearest and dearest to witness the big day, it will let your guests know the expected attire and formality, as well as prepare remaining decisions like menu selections and guest invitees. Perhaps most importantly, the invitation becomes one of the first keepsake heirlooms from your wedding. In a world of digital revolutions, having the tactile keepsake to fill that hope chest is and should be treasured dearly. However it is that you invite your guests, the invitation should collect the following information:

-name of the bride and groom to marry
-date and time of the ceremony
-location of the ceremony
-reception details (unless the reception details are accommodated on a separate card)

What All Should I Include?
Any standard wedding invitation may clearly include the invitation and its corresponding envelope as well as a response card and its corresponding envelope. In addition to these two pieces, you may include a separate card for the reception info, a map, or an accommodations card.

WEDDING INVITATION
The Wedding Invitation will clearly represent the most important information. This is typically the largest and hierarchy of the pieces that will build your suite. The invitation will let the guests know who is hosting the wedding, who is getting married, and the details about the date, time, and venue.

RESPONSE CARD
Also known as RSVP or reply card, the response card gives you an opportunity to request specific information from your guests.

-Accept or Regrets
There is a range of ways you can ask whether or not your guest will be in attendance. A more formal version would be “happily accepts” or “regretfully declines.” You can use an alternative, more playful version like “be there with bells on” or “sending happy thoughts.”

-Specifically WHO is invited
Commonly found on a response card is the indication requesting how many total guests will be in attendance. The phrase “____ number of guests in attendance” may be used. For a more specific list, many couples opt for requesting a written list of each attendee. If you are having an adult-only wedding, requesting the written list may be a great option for you to prevent any misunderstandings. 

-Meal Choice
In the South, the more common buffet style wedding is what you will observe. However, in my experience with couples who are hosting a formal sit-down meal, you may want to include the meal choices on your response card. This means that you will have to have those selections finalized BEFORE sending out your invitations. It’s best to ask your guests on the response card to place initials by each guest’s selection rather than a simple tally mark or number. Meal selections are of course not necessary, but generally coincide with the formality of the wedding. You (or your wedding planner) should have those meal options set and noted before meeting with your stationer.

-Fun Details Requested
A less formal wedding may include some fun options on the response card, like a song request: “I promise to dance if you play _____________” or a “words of wisdom” section. If this becomes an option for you, have fun with it. You can make a keepsake book of all your responses!

RECEPTION CARD
A reception card is a separate card dedicated to the reception details that will follow the ceremony. Reception cards are used for both on and off-site receptions. A reception card may have details that provide the reception time and location: “reception to follow at Il Mercato). For off-site receptions, it’s typically not necessary that you include the city & state on the reception card, as it is never very far from the ceremony venue. For on-site receptions, there is often a cocktail hour in between the two. This is usually the time that the bride and groom are taking photos and will often provide a social activity before they are announced. This information may be included on the reception card: “join us for cocktails in the courtyard immediately following the ceremony dinner & dancing to follow at seven o’clock”

ACCOMMODATIONS & DETAILS CARD
An accommodations or details card may be used to list out any and all details regarding to the wedding festivities. This may include hotel accommodations, wedding website information, wedding weekend details, or post-wedding gatherings.

MAP CARDS
Map cards are used both subjectively and objectively as a general or specific reference to the location of either the ceremony venue or reception venue, or both. Map cards present a great illustrative contrast to wedding suites that generally display lots of text. In a world of digital revolutions, with Google Maps at our fingertips, map cards are a fun way to bring back a nostalgic impression for your guests to enjoy. They make great little art prints as well (pre-wedding wedding favor? ...maybe!).

ASSEMBLY DETAILS
How do I stuff all of this in an envelope? There are a number of things to consider when thinking about assembly. If you have several pieces that build your suite, you may want to house everything in an inner envelope or think about using some pretty ribbon or band to “house” it all together. Here are some common assembly options:

pocket envelopes:
A pocket envelope is a small folder of sorts with sleeves that house each card that build your suite. You may have your invitation mounted on the left side of the open “folder” with the left side housing the add-on pieces. This pocket envelope would then be placed in its outer envelope (the mailing envelope).

inner envelopes:
An inner serves two purposes. The inner envelope may house all of your pieces simply stacked on top of each other in its proper order as well as entail who is invited. The outer & inner envelope is a formal and traditional practice where the outer envelope would state the more formal “Mr. and Mrs. Michael Dean Johnson” guest name and address, with the inner stating “Mr. and Mrs. Johnson, Miss Norah, Henry.” (see more about addressing in part three)

ribbons or bands:
Using ribbons or paper bands is also an excellent way to house all of your pieces together. Ribbons are a great way to add some color, texture, and mood to a more traditional piece. It’s a happy balance between the two and is my personal favorite. Embellish the ribbons with a wax seal and dried greenery and you have yourself a simple, but showcase-worthy piece.

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Stay tuned for part three in this four part “Building Your Wedding Suite Series”
part three | envelope addressing & etiquette

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DID YOU MISS THE FIRST POST? Catch up here.
 

BUILDING YOUR WEDDING SUITE SERIES: part one

PART ONE: Timelines, Budgets, and Printing Method

A wedding is, every time, a lovely expression of a couple’s story. Following the engagement is a series of tasks and to-dos that can pile quickly. Wedding Stationery, and all its moving parts, is one of the key factors during your wedding planning journey. Here are some things to consider when you are ready to tackle your wedding stationery:

IMG_5464.JPG

TIMELINE
Mentioned above, the wedding invitation is a key piece of the puzzle during your wedding planning. It will entail several essential factors for both you and your guests to discover. Before deciding which route you’d like to take with your stationery, a general rule of thumb timeline will be a good tool to abide by.

Save the Dates:
-mailed 6-9 months prior to the big day
-entail the couple getting married, wedding date, location of the wedding (city & state, venue if booked)

Wedding Invitations:
-mailed 8-12 weeks prior to the big day
-entail the couple getting married, wedding date & time, location of the ceremony, and details about reception, responses, and/or accommodations (more on series two)

BUDGET
There are lots of different sources that will give you an estimated budget you should allocate for stationery. Many budgets often exclude the afterthoughts wedding stationery can incur once you reach that planning mode. Here are some factors you will want to consider when planning your stationery budget:

The Nuts & Bolts
save the dates
printing method
envelope addressing or calligraphy for save the dates
postage for the save the dates
invitation suite
printing method
envelope addressing or calligraphy for wedding invitations
main postage for the wedding stationery (often higher than a typical letter)
response card postage
day-of stationery (rehearsal dinner invites, programs, menu cards, etc.)

Quantity & Guest List:
One of the first questions I ask my couples before issuing a proposal (different than the one the bride was issued) is “how many pieces will you need?,” and that is when I often receive back an “ummmm.” The general rule of thumb is to account for roughly 2/3 of your guest list. If you are inviting a total of 300 guests, you will probably need about 200 invitations.

Guest List:
You’ll want to start working on your guest list right away. If you are going to have your envelopes digitally printed, download this address template here. If you are going to have your envelopes hand-written by a calligrapher, it’s best to contact your calligrapher to ask what format you’d like your addresses. There is nothing worse than working so hard on that spreadsheet to find out the format is all wrong!

PRINTING METHOD:

flat printing

flat printing

letterpress printing

letterpress printing

Flat Printing
Flat printing is the simplest and most affordable route for printing. Your design can be printed from professional digital printers producing a highly desired look. Flat printing is great for cost reasons, but also yield certain mediums that are not achievable using other methods. Flat printing is great if you have any sort of graphics, like watercolor or various colors. Whereas letterpress printing prints opaque, solid colors and appeal best to more line art, sketch type of graphics.

Letterpress Printing & Foil Printing
Letterpress printing, contrasting from flat printing, is considered a high-end printing medium. Letterpress printing is more labor intensive and costly than flat printing, but appreciated for its tactile impression it leaves in its textured, thicker papers. Like Letterpress Printing, gold foil is also a high-end printing method, as its labor and set up is more intensive and costly. Gold foil can be mixed with letterpress printing and flat printing and comes in various colors (black, gold, rose gold, silver, white, and more).  

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Should I Send Out Save the Dates?
Save the dates can be extremely helpful to those who have large wedding parties, wedding parties located in several different cities or states, or for the couple wanting to set the tone and formality of the wedding early on.

Save the Dates include the following information:
-the couple to marry (last names included)
-the wedding date
-the location of the wedding: if the venue has not been decided, you can include the city & state) -wedding website: wedding websites are often included on the save the dates to inform guest about the upcoming event (wedding websites are NOT included on the main invitation)

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Stay tuned for part two in this four part “Building Your Wedding Suite Series”
part two | the wedding invitation basics

my (pre)pinterest wedding

I have to admit something that I'm kind of ashamed to admit. My best cousin and my best friend are both getting married next year and I'm secretly (or not so secretly) living vicariously through them. See, I was married before wedding blogs were as popular as they are now. I was married before Pinterest was invited. I was married before Anthropologie launched their wedding line, BHLDN (I'm still upset about that one). However, I couldn't be more thankful. 

My husband and I have been going to the same school together since kindergarten. I wasn't particularly fond of him. He was the class clown. Fast forward to circa 2009, we were married at the young age of 20. We were crazy, but all we knew is that marriage was our next step, no matter our age. 

On August 8th, we have hit seven years together, twelve years total, and have added two little ones to the mix. Looking back at some old wedding photos, I am so fond of the special little moments and experiences we had. You know why? Because they were OURS. 

We had no idea how to plan a wedding and to be honest, we really were not concerned with the aesthetic details. ...not like I would be today, that's for sure. Maybe that's why I'm living vicariously through others. Because I'll be the first to admit that if I was married today ...we just won't go there.

The most important thing to us was the experience. ...we wanted smiles and laughter, we wanted candid moments with our nearest and dearest, we to begin our marriage.

We inadvertently curated these memories and these moments that we simply could not replicate if we wanted to. Up at the alter, my super soon-to-be husband handed me this little gold chest. I had no idea he was going to give me this. He gave me this little "I'll explain later" look, so I simply smiled and held the gold chest during the ceremony. 

After the ceremony, he explained that these coins came from his mother's side of the family. There were thirteen coins. The custom of the giving originated in Spain and is usually associated with Hispanic culture. My husband's mother's family is from Mexico and still carry many of their culture's traditions. The coins were filled with symbolic meaning signifying the grooms willingness to support his bride. The bride's acceptance symbolized trust and confidence and unconditional love. The thirteen coins recognized Christ and His twelve apostles in recognition of the newfound marriage. I'll never forget the shaky voice as my husband of ten minutes explained where this came from after the ceremony.

There were heaps of moments like this that just kept popping up. There were certain smiles that were candidly caught on camera. There were certain moments I'll never forget. Maybe I'm just a little nostalgic since my anniversary just passed, but I'm so thankful for the simplicity that meaningful choices can make in a wedding. Because at the end of the day, it's all about the marriage that will follow. That's the real story. 

PS: 

When we were engaged, I was (at the time) in college for Business Management. It wasn't until the semester after we were married that I was an art major. Although I have always had my hands in creativity, I did not know the process of letterpress printing. I did not know what my personal style was. I was not a designer. My invitations were very traditional. Oh and I just thought they were the greatest thing ever, and they were beautiful for what they were. I simply cannot imagine designing my own wedding invitation if I were to marry today (to the same Beau of course).

Maybe I'll have to renew my vows one day to find out!

 
THE WHITE SPARROW BARN | Save the Dates

Meet Sarah Jones and Chris Mohring. Are they not just the cutest couple you've ever seen? I have not had the pleasure of meeting the groom to be, but feel super connected to him through Sarah. Sarah is a former colleague of mine. We both graduated in Fine Arts from Louisiana State University and spent much of our studio lab hours together, covered in ink and elbow grease. 

I'll be honest. I was beyond thrilled and honored really when Sarah contacted me to design her wedding stationery suite. Sarah Jones was entrusting me with one of her wedding planning elements and I KNEW stationery was on her top three most important to-do's. 

Sarah majored in Printmaking back in college and had such a talent creating these magnificent sheets of paper, using that paper for sculptures and installations for gallery shows. We hadn't talked much since graduating other than tid-bits through social media. So I was thrilled and filled with a bit of nostalgia reminiscing about old print lab days at LSU.

I have to tell you that reconnecting with you and reimbursing myself in my old life of being ink and paper pulp covered has completely stirred up my art bug all over again.
— Sarah Jones

I cannot tell you how many time I physically squealed after reading one of our emails. When she mentioned that the design process uprooted her old art life, I may have actually teared up. Okay, I did. Sarah had pulled out some old paper installations to sketch some ideas of using them as a repurposed installation behind her head table at her and Chris's reception.  

Speaking of the venue, this barn. THIS BARN. The White Sparrow Barn sits in an open field in Union Valley, Texas and is the most charming barn my eyes have ever seen. Part of the process of custom designing a stationery suite includes inspirations from colors, florals, and sometimes the venue itself. Once I heard the words "The White Sparrow Barn" from Sarah, I issued another squeal. 

I had about one hundred and one ideas floating around in my head, but knew I wanted to tie in the handmade paper to Sarah's past and that simplicity and the work of the hand would best suit this suite.

A simple shade of grey ink, handmade cotton rag paper, hand illustrated barn sketch and lettering ...and we have Sarah and Chris's save the dates. The wedding day stationery that will follow, well, we will just save that for another day. ...and there goes another squeal.


A special shout out to Texas photographer, Chloe Gonzales. She beautifully captured the essence of these two for their engagement shoot. I am looking forward to being smitten all over again with the upcoming wedding photos!


paper and ribbon | silk & willow
design and printing | yours truly
lovely engagement photos | chloe gonzales

 

 
 
FIVE TASKS & TIPS FOR YOUR WEDDING STATIONERY TO-DO

1) SET A DATE & VENUE
Before you venture over to your stationery to-do-list, you need to have some of the big things checked off first. Your date, venue(s), and ceremony and reception time need to be decided upon. If you are sending out save the dates, you only need to confirm your date. Keep in mind though that your date often depends on certain venue availability. 

2) ALLOCATE A BUDGET
Brides have an endless amount of options for wedding stationery. ...local stationery shops, etsy business owners, the Pinterest-inspired DIY bride. No matter the route, whether it's in hiring a professional designer or opting to invest your own time, stationery is just that - an investment. Brides often budget for $800-1200 for wedding stationery. The best thing you can do is give yourself a comfortable number and let that budget determine the "must haves." It may be that letterpress printed stationery is really important to you or that you KNOW you want to have the envelopes addressed in calligraphy. Establish a budget and work backwards to get the best of what you can get with that number.

3) ESTABLISH YOUR AESTHETIC
The aesthetics involved in your wedding stationery should be intentional. The ink color, the paper choice, the assembly ...it all represents the type of wedding celebration your guests will expect to attend. For example, you may not want a super traditional or over-the-top formal invitation for a backyard soireé. You'd probably want to lean towards the more casual side. These decisions are often inspired by your color schemes, an overall feel or mood you want to create, etc. You're going to want to have a general direction of where you want your stationery to take you.

4) TIMELINE
You typically want to mail your invitations 8-12 weeks before your wedding. If you opt for save the dates, you typically send those roughly 8-12 months prior to the wedding or as soon as your date and venue is set. If you are investing in a professional designer to create your stationery. You'd want to allow at least a few months of planning. You also want to make sure you give yourself or your calligrapher enough time to address your envelopes. The sooner the better is usually key here.

5) COORDINATE YOUR DAY-OFF PIECES
Once the save the dates have been sent and the wedding invitations printed, there are still some lingering after-math pieces to keep in mind. There is nothing better than a series of paper goods intertwined through out your wedding that all compliment each other. Some of the items you may want to think about including for the day off are you programs, menu cards, place cards, thank you notes, or even a special print or card to use as wedding favors or a special gift to a family member.


PERSONAL PREFERENCES AND TIPS 


PURCHASE A CUSTOM ADDRESS STAMP
A custom address stamp is super affordable and has a multitude of uses. If you purchase this stamp early enough, you can begin using this stamp for thank you notes after showers and as your return address on save the dates, shower venues, and celebrations. You can also use this stamp for the return address on your wedding stationery and/or your recipient address for your response card's return back to you. ...then of course all of your snail mail post wedding stationery.

STAMPS & POSTAGE
Try to find a stamp that coordinates with your stationery. The post office usually has some ...ehh "generic" wedding stamps. I would recommend opting for a custom stamp.  ...even better, use a vintage stamp collection if you can. You can find vintage stamps on eBay by seaching "unused uncanceled stamps." 

IMPORTANT: Ask your postman (or woman) to hand meter your envelopes. Otherwise, you'll end up with those ugly black lines at the bottom of your envelope. That's a good way to make your calligrapher cry. 

WEDDING WEBSITES
Wedding websites are a fantastic way to have your guests updated on the latest wedding news, allow for accommodations, and even allowing your guest to rsvp in advance. Opt for your own domain name. Domain names are super affordable, you can usually create one for about $10 for a whole year. As a stationery designer, I know www.TheJohnsonsBigDay.com looks way nicer than www.Name/us/SomeVenue/somethingelse.com ...don't you think?

PACK YOUR STATIONERY TO THE WEDDING
Everyone should have a really great photo of their stationery. Go ahead and pack your stationery suite in your wedding day bag to have the photographer snap a great shot of that pretty paper. 

FRAME YOUR INVITATION
Your invitation, along with your dress and maybe some heirlooms are one of just a few tactile things you'll actually preserve from your wedding day. The first anniversary calls for "paper." Frame your wedding invitation as an anniversary gift to remind yourself and your spouse why you chose one another. Maybe write a hand written note to keep on the back side of the frame. 


 
 
WEDDING STATIONERY | rustic barn wedding for the mississippi bride & louisiana groom

What a pleasure it's been to work with Ashley King (future Caruso), future lawyer and sweetest person alive. Growing up in Mississippi, she was surrounded by cotton fields and southern landscapes that would make anyone's soul feel warm. It's no surprise that she fell in love with Blake, a Louisiana boy, who is as easy going as the cotton field winds she grew up around!

Ashley and Blake wanted a simple save the date and a coordinating wedding invitation. Recycled kraft paper was a must for her, so I knew this would be a breeze for me. Recycled kraft paper and I are best friends. 

Ashley's save the dates were letterpress printed in a dark charcoal ink on recycled kraft!

The wedding invitations were printed on a cotton paper (how appropriate) paired with the same recycled policy envelope as the save the dates. The ink matched the envelopes and all together, these two pieces are the sweetest and simplest duo my eyes have ever seen.

Another great thing I love about these invitations is the way we incorporated Blake and Ashley's wedding website as their rsvp option. Many brides opt out of having a response card simply for the reason that they're not always returned. Wedding websites are becoming more and more popular as a way to have readily accessible information in regards to the wedding, rsvp included. For a non-traditional wedding stationery ensemble, this is the perfect way to include the extra information without the extra pieces. 

I am so happy to be a guest at this wedding this upcoming January. My husband and I are great friends with the groom, and now we get to grow our relationship with Ashley. Their love is as amazing as the rustic barn they will wed at, in the strawberry fields of Louisiana and I just cannot wait to witness the atmosphere and joining of the Mississippi bride and Louisiana groom. 


 
 
WEDDING STATIONERY | the right way to do glitter | louisiana wedding

Blake and Lauren. Blake and Lauren have been a couple for as long as my husband and I. Graduating from the same high school, marrying our high school sweethearts ...a common small town love story. 

I've curated lots of work for Lauren's hosted parties over the years, so when her and Blake became engaged, I was over the moon to work together on her biggest hosted event yet! After our initial chat, I knew she'd want to pair simplicity with a little something extra. 

One of the first sentences out of her mouth: "I think I want to add some bling." My initial thought was to tell her she was crazy, but I knew we could do this right. There is certainly a tasteful way to incorporate shimmer and shine.

Lauren and Blake are having a traditional Catholic wedding mass and wanted the stationery to reflect the formalness of the church ceremony. The design was based around a subtle boldness, two opposite words that complimented each other so well through out each wedding piece that completed this suite.

BLACK, BLUSH, AND SHIMMER

The black text was balanced with luxe blush pink and soft white envelopes. ...the shimmer was just the perfect icing on the cake. The invitations and response cards were letterpress printed on cotton paper. The envelopes looked luscious with a shimmer envelope liner that really made the piece pop. All wrapped up with a letterpress printed seal mounted on a black band, this suite was complete.

Lauren's wedding shower invitations were the preface to the wedding stationery. A softer grey and a touch of floral gave Lauren's guests a visual sneak peek to the wedding stationery that was soon to come. Then, the programs added the appropriate accessory pieces to really finalize this whole "black, blush, and shimmer" wedding stationery suite.  

Wishing the future Huvals the happiest of all wedding days this weekend. I'm sure the wedding will sparkle as much as the sweet couple and their stationery. All my love to these two!

xx,
Hope Johnson

 

The Keeping Room | Baton Rouge Wedding Stationery

Almost a year ago, I contacted The Keeping Room in Baton Rouge in hopes for some interest in carrying TLBC's product line. Many clients and friends have referred me to this shop, so I thought, well hey, let's check it out. After speaking with Amanda, the owner, we trained off on how I got started and where I have my work printed. I told her I own my own letterpress printing business. This conversation lead us to a collaborated wedding stationery album. After months and months of preparations, designing, testing, and of course printing, TLBC and TKR has combined our efforts and talents to create ten, one-of-a-kind wedding collections. ...with full intentions of watching it grow to more.

IMG_7570.jpg

We are BEYOND thrilled to have all of our work alongside The Keeping Room's work inside one big album! So we of course celebrated along with some fantastic fellow businesses in the wedding industry. Joined in to help us celebrate was Alli Sims, who owns a fantastic wedding planning service as well as Cupcake Couture. Also joining in and displayed a beautiful wedding gown was I Do Bridal Couture. Plantation Florist supplied nothing short of the most lovely floral arrangements my eyes have ever laid eyes on. While we all swooned over the pretties, we did so by munching on some amazing eats from Gourmet Girls. (see sources below)
 

I got the bright and crazy idea to bring my first table-top press along for a ride. I really wanted everyone to get an idea of the process that goes behind letterpress printing. Success. Our guests were able to pull their own print and got a feel (literally) for the labor that goes behind printing. Of course, the work is done on a much larger press, but the concept all the same and I believe everyone left with a new appreciation for letterpress printing.

SO MUCH GOOD FOOD. These people are amazing. (see references below)

This collaboration has really lead us to focus on supporting local businesses. The in-house customer service and one-on-one attention we are able to give each couple establishes a more personal relationship that doesn't end at the wedding day. The evening was absolutely lovely. If you didn't get a chance to stop by, don't fret, The Keeping Room isn't going anywhere. Stop by their beautiful shop off of Perkins Road and ask to see the new album! I am looking forward to working with TKR and new couples to tailor each suite to their ideal wedding stationery. Ode to new adventures!


sources
wedding stationery | THE little BLUE CHAIR & The Keeping Room
florist | Plantation Florist
catering | Gourmet Girls
cupcakes | Cupcake Couture
wedding planner | Alli Sims
wedding gown display | I Do Bridal Couture
 

TLBC TIP | how to save time addressing your stationery

We all know how fast your wedding to-do-list can lengthen. The tedious tasks are seemingly the ones that all get piled up and saved for the last minute. When a couple receives their wedding stationery, the addressing typically still needs to be tackled.

TLBC TIP

Have an address stamp made. You can use this stamp for the back flap of your outer envelope as well as the front recipient address of your rsvp envelopes. A personalized stamp is the gift that keeps giving. Continue to use this stamp after the wedding for thank you notes and future mail outs!

This is an affordable and easy way to save some time. These stamps run roughly $20-$40 depending on whether you create a wood stamp with an ink pad or a self-inking stamp. Both last for years and are great investments (and gifts).


Customize a stamp to suit and seal your stationery suite. These are a few of our past favorites, but feel free to throw your own ideas at us and we can create something just for you.

WHAT'S YOUR COLOR? | five must-see color schemes for wedding stationery

ALL THE COLORS. Picking a wedding color scheme is not something brides often think of in regard to their stationery. When designing wedding stationery, I often ask questions like "what color are your bridesmaids' dresses?" or "what colors would I find in your floral arrangements?" I like to tie in these colors withing your stationery to really create a cohesive color scheme with your wedding.

Neutral is definitely in, but don't be afraid of a pop of color. Here are some color combination trends happening in the wedding stationery world.

natural, charcoal, white

natural, plum, white, tiffany blue

peach, latte, cream

olive, pale pink, oatmeal grey, light blue

grey, white


What's your wedding's personality color?

A WATER COLOR WEDDING

A friend of mine came to me when it was time to dream up her perfect wedding suite. Her inspirations were all stemmed from her floral arrangements and the colors that bloomed from a May wedding in the midst of a Louisiana spring.

a floral inspired color scheme

a floral inspired color scheme

photo cred | Collin Richie | www.collinrichiephoto.com

Now, when I think spring, I think water. So a watercolor splash over letterpress text was my first thought we leaped from. We took the color scheme of the floral and toned it down to a subtle pallet for the stationery. Keeping the text traditionally worded and the fonts script let the watercolor spread on its on turf. Each splash is one-of-a-kind truly creating a special suite for each guest to open.

coral + mint + yellow

Kristi was a breeze to work with and had such a lovely wedding to show for herself. TLBC wishes her many years of happiness with her newlywed.



TLBC loves to incorporate something special ...something whimsical to each design. That extra little hand touch is what makes this process so extraordinary. Take a look at the cards below to see a few other pieces we've incorporated that hand-painted touch to.

These are two of our favorite combinations of mediums: letterpress (obviously) and watercolor. Each piece is something special, just like you!